Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Trip to Anartica: Disabilities question Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Trip to Anartica: Disabilities question

    (from the previous forum archives)

    From: Gregg Hunter: Fairview,MT,USA,North America


    I am curious to know if your trips are scheduled during winter times and I am also wondering what kind of hospitalization is there in Antartica? And what kind of support would you supply for a epileptic person like myself going there?


    From: Paul Ward, Webmaster




    Hi Gregg,
    There are no trips to Antarctica in the winter. The only activity is on National Programme bases, and then it's by people who arrived in the summer and won't leave again until the next summer.
    As for hospital facilities - thin to non-existent. Antarctic cruises are not like other cruises where ships call at towns and cities with all of the medical facilities that you would expect. Ships will carry a medic of some sort, but facilities vary greatly according to the size of the ship. In an emergency, pretty much all the ship could do would be to steam back to the nearest port which may well be a few days sailing away. It may be possible to visit a national base if there are facilities and personnel available.
    Anyone with any kind of disability or medical need should contact a reputable tour company and explain the situation in as much detail as possible so that the Antarctic trip can be tailored to the individual need. I'm no doctor, but there's no reason that a disability that does not disallow someone to live a fairly normal life at home should particularly prevent a trip to Antarctica.



    From: Drummond Small



    Hi Gregg, I suppose it depends how well controlled your epilepsy is. I am epileptic too and probably was when I was in Antarctica for 2 years in the 70s (undiagnosed and no seizures till later). It also depends, I suppose, if you are planning to travel with a companion who is aware of your condition. I would suggest you contact travel companies offering tours and establish their policy. After all, many Antarctic 'tourists' are elderly and not necessarily in 'prime' condition. I hope you are successful. Best wishes.
    Last edited by Paul Ward; 12th February 2006, 23:42.
Working...
X