Robert Falcon Scott - Terra Nova
British Antarctic Expedition 1910-13


The Crew Alphabetically

Shore party

Atkinson, Edward L. , R.N. - surgeon, parasitologist
Bowers, Henry Robertson - Lieutenant
Campbell, Victor - Lieutenant, R.N.
Evans, Edward R.G.R. - Lieutenant, R.N. "Teddy Evans" - second in command, and Captain of the Terra Nova
Levick, G. Murray - Surgeon, R.N.
Oates, Lawrence , Capt. 6th Iniskilling Dragoons
Scott, Robert Falcon Commander, R.N. - Expedition leader


Scientific Staff

Day, Bernard C. - Motor engineer
Debenham, Frank - Geologist
Cherry-Garrard, Apsley  - Assistant zoologist
Gran, Tryggve - ski expert
Meares, Cecil H. - in charge of dogs
Nelson, Edward W. - Biologist
Ponting, Herbert G. - Camera artist
Priestley, Raymond E. - Geologist
Simpson, George - Meteorologist
Taylor, T. Griffith - Geologist
Wilson, Edward Adrian - chief of scientific staff and biologist
Wright, Charles Seymour - Physicist


Crew

Abbot, George - petty officer, R.N.
Archer, W.W. - Chief steward, late R.N.
Brewster, A. - Able seaman
Browning, Frank V. - petty officer, 2nd class, R.N.
Clissold, Thomas - cook, late R.N.
Crean, Tom , petty officer, R.N.
Dickason, Harry - Able seaman, R.N.
Evans, Edgar - petty officer, R.N.
Forde, Robert - petty officer, R.N.
Girev (Geroff), Dmitrii - Dog driver
Hooper, F.J. - Steward, late R.N.
Keohane, Patrick - petty officer, R.N.
Lashly, William - chief stoker, R.N.
Omelchenko
, Anton - Groom
Williamson, Thomas, S. - petty officer, R.N.

Ship's Party

Bailey, Arthur S. - Petty officer, 2nd class, R.N.
Balson, Albert - Leading seaman, R.N.
Brissenden, Robert - Leading stoker, R.N.
Bruce, Wilfred M. - Commander, R.N.R.
Burton, William - Leading stoker, R.N.
Cheetham, Alfred B. - Boatswain (Bosun), R.N.R.
Davies, Francis E.C. - Leading shipwright, R.N.
Dennistoun, James R. - In charge of mules in the ship.
Drake, Francis R.H. - Asst. Paymaster, R.N. (retired), secretary and meteorologist in the ship.
Heald, William L. - R.N., Late P.O.
Horton, William A. - Engine room artificer, R.N. 2nd Engineer
Knowles, William - Able seaman
Lammas, Charles - Fireman
Leese, Joseph - Able seaman, R.N.
Lillie, Dennis G. - Biologist in the ship
Mather, John Hugh - Petty officer, R.N.V.R.
McCarthy, Mortimer - Able seaman
McDonald, Angus - Fireman
McDonald, William - Able seaman
McGillon, Thomas - Fireman
McKenzie, Edward A. - Leading stoker, R.N.
McLeod, Thomas F. - Able seaman
Neale, W.H. - Steward
Oliphant, Robert - Able seaman
Parsons, Frederick - Petty officer, R.N.
Paton, James - Able seaman
Pennell, Harry L.L. - Commander, R.N.
Rennick, Henry E. de P. - Lieutenant, R.N.
Skelton, James - Able seaman
Stone, Bernard J. - Leading stoker, R.N.
Williams, Charles - Able seaman
Williams, William - Chief engine room artificer, R.N. Engineer


Other crew members

Bradley, Percy, Oscar, Derry - Ordinary seaman
Copp, W.J. - Ordinary seaman
Kelly, W. - Fireman
Webb, J.K. - E.R.A. 2d


The Crew In More Detail

    bullet denotes other Arctic or Antarctic expeditionary experience, prior to, or following this expedition

Shore Party


Atkinson, Edward L.

Atkinson, Edward Leicester R.N. - surgeon, parasitology

    Born on the 23 November 1881 in Trinidad, Atkinson was light heavyweight boxing champion at his hospital during his medical training, he qualified as a doctor in 1906.

    He was in command of the Terra Nova Expedition's Cape Evans base for most of 1912 and as a doctor cared for several patients through a difficult winter. He led the party which found the tent with the bodies of Scott,  Bowers and Wilson. He served with distinction in the WW1 being decorated twice and wounded several times. He served in the navy until he died suddenly in 1929 at the age of 47.


Bowers, Henry Robertson, Birdie - Lieutenant

Bowers, Henry Robertson "Birdie" - Lieutenant

    A Scot, born in Greenock, Bowers father died when he was three, his mother then moved the family to London. He became a sea cadet and joined the navy serving in India before being recommended to Scott by Sir Clements Markham being appointed without an interview.

    His role was originally that of storekeeper on the ship, but he soon proved he was capable of far more than this, he accompanied Cherry-Garrard and Wilson in their trip to Cape Crozier to retrieve an emperor penguin egg, famously written about in the book "The Worst Journey in the World". Bowers was originally one of the men who was to aid with supporting the South Pole attempt though not a part of the final party. Scott included him however when the support team turned back making him the 5th member of what had been planned logistically as a 4 man group. He died on the way back from the South Pole with Scott and Wilson in their tent, he was 29 years of age.

    Known as "Birdie" for his distinctively shaped nose, he was a powerfully built man, just 5 feet 4 inches tall (1.63m), popular with his companions as hard working, endlessly cheerful, dependable and tough. He was a figure of some fascination for the other men by his habit of stripping naked outside every morning once they had arrived in the Antarctic, and throwing buckets of icy water and slush over himself to acclimatize himself for what was to come.

    "The hardest traveller that ever undertook a Polar journey as well as one of the most undaunted." - Scott
    "There was nothing subtle about him. He was transparently simple, straightforward, and unselfish" - Cherry-Garrard

    29 July 1883 - 29 March 1912.


Edgar Evans

Campbell, Victor Lindsay Arbuthnot - First Officer - Lieutenant, R.N.

    Born in Brighton, England, Campbell severed initially in the merchant navy before receiving a Royal Navy commission in 1895. He resigned this in 1901 and lived the life of a country gentleman before joining Scott on the Terra Nova.

    Campbell led an Eastern Party of 6 men to carry out scientific work, failing to find a landing site, they returned westward again when he met Roald Amundsen on the Fram in the Bay of Whales. On return Campbell's party became the Northern Party, built a hut and wintered at Cape Adare in 1911. They were transferred about 250 miles by the Terra Nova to Evans Coves with enough sledging rations for 6 weeks and the intention of staying 2 weeks before being picked up again. Sea ice conditions meant that the ship could not reach them and they had to over-winter again. An ice cave was excavated on Inexpressible Island and a miserable winter ensued, rations being extended with the occasional seal or penguin that could be killed.

    They left at the end of winter on the 30th of September 1912, heading for Cape Evans, crossing 200 miles of sea ice to arrive on the 7th of November. Campbell assumed command of the Terra Nova after being told of the death of Scott and the Polar Party as he was the senior remaining naval officer.

    Campbell was decorated for his part in the WW1, rose to the rank of Captain and was awarded the OBE, he migrated to Newfoundland in 1922 where he farmed and fished, he died in 1956.

    20 August 1875 - 19 November 1956


Edward Evans

Evans , Edward Ratcliffe Garth Russell "Teddy" - Navigator and second in command, Captain of the Terra Nova - Lieutenant, R.N.

Second Officer - Morning 1902-04

    Born in London, the son of a barrister into a respectable middle class family, though as a young child along with his two brothers frequently misbehaved to the point where for a time he was sent to a school for "troublesome boys". He attempted to enter the Royal Navy as a cadet but was turned down, success at a training ship mainly for the merchant navy eventually won him a place as a midshipman on HMS Hawke. He had met Scott on HMS Majestic and after his Discovery expedition had left read about a relief ship the "Morning" which was to be sent a year later in 1902, after writing to and then meeting Sir Clements Markham Evans was seconded from the navy to be second officer on the Morning. Evans made two trips from New Zealand to Antarctica on the Morning spending the austral winter in between in New Zealand on a British navy ship stationed there. He considered applying to Shackleton's Nimrod expedition but thought it important for his career to remain in the navy.

    In 1909 he started planning his own expedition to Antarctica with Markham's support, though on hearing of Scott's new expedition, he abandoned his own plans and was appointed second-in-command of the expedition and Captain of the Terra Nova. Scott named the first landing site on Ross Island, Cape Evans in his honour and Evans joined the shore party leaving the Terra Nova under the command of Pennell. Evans was involved in depot laying in advance for the polar party and after the winter was in charge of the four man "Motor Party", the first to set out as part of the South Pole attempt, their task was to carry and depot more supplies. The motor sledges were not successful being unreliable at best, the first broke down completely after five days followed by the other one a day later leading to a rearrangement of loads onto a single sledge and manhauling at about the same speed as before. Evans was in the last group to be turned back 160 miles from the pole after not being selected for the final Pole Party, by this time, he and Lashly had pulled loaded sledges for 600 miles in over 2 months.

    The journey back was difficult for Evans, he developed snow blindness and began to show the signs of scurvy, he was weakened and in pain, after two weeks he was being pulled on the sledge by his companions Lashly and Crean. Evans was the only one to suffer from scurvy to the degree that he did, the cause probably being that he avoided eating seal meat through the winter especially the liver because he didn't like it, and so didn't get the supplies of vitamin C that those who ate it did.

    On the 13th of Feb what Evans later referred to as "the first and last time my orders as a naval officer were disobeyed" occured when he tried to order his companions to leave him. A blizzard stopped them four days later 35 miles from the hut, Lashly stayed with Evans while Crean walked for 18 hours when he met with Atkinson, Gerov and a dog team at hut Point. They retrieved Evans and Lashly when the weather improved, Evans was close to death, and was carefully taken back to the hut. He was placed on the Terra Nova and remained bedridden until April when the ship reached New Zealand. He initially returned to England, before going back to New Zealand to command the Terra Nova on her final relief journey to Antarctica when he learned of Scott's death on January 13th 1913. He assumed command of the expedition and arranged the final departure from the continent.

    Evans returned to the Royal Navy serving with distinction and receiving promotion and the Distinguished Service Order in the WW1, he became Rear Admiral Commanding HM Australian Squadron in 1928 and a full admiral in 1936. He served in the Norwegian Campaign at the start of the Second World War before retiring at the age of 60 in 1941. He became a peer in 1945 as Baron Mountevans amongst the many honours and awards he was given from a number of countries in his lifetime, he died in Norway in 1957.

    28 October 1880 - 20 August 1957


Edgar Evans

Levick, George Murray - Surgeon, R.N. Zoologist

    Born in born in Newcastle upon Tyne, Murray studied medicine at St Bartholomew's Hospital and joined the Royal Navy in 1902, a specialist in physical training.

    A member of the Northern Party, he spent the austral summer of 1911-1912 at Cape Adare amongst the largest Adelie penguin colony in the world. A part his studies of this colony were published initially in Greek only due to what he considered the "depraved" sexual practices of the penguins. He over wintered with five others in an ice cave in particularly uncomfortable conditions when they could not be picked up again by the Terra Nova due to ice conditions.

    He served in the WW1 and was promoted to Fleet Surgeon. He founded the Public Schools Exploring Society in 1932 and was president until his death in 1956.

    1876 - 1956

    The Project Gutenberg EBook of Antarctic Penguins, by George Murray Levick


Edgar Evans

Oates, Lawrence Edward Grace, Capt. 6th Iniskilling Dragoons

    Born in London in 1880 into a wealthy family, Oates attended Eton College for two years before attending an army "crammer" school and joining the army in 1898. He served in the Boer War with distinction, a gunshot wound to his left leg left it an inch shorter than the right.

    He applied to Scott to join the Terra Nova Expedition and was accepted because of his expertise with horses, his role was to look after the 19 ponies intended for sledge hauling. He also contributed £1,000 (worth about £109,000 in 2017) to the expedition. He was rather disparaging about the quality of the ponies that Scott had bought, of Scott's lack of expertise in his endeavour and at times of Scott himself. Nonetheless he was selected as part of the 5 man South Pole Party. After reaching the pole and finding Amundsen's flag and tent already there, Oates weakened more quickly than the others on the way back, in particular he suffered from frost bitten feet. On the 15th of March 1912, Oates told his companions he could go no further and suggested they left him in his sleeping bag as he was slowing them down considerably, they refused and he managed a few more miles, his condition worsened.

    Lawrence Oates walked into the history books when on March 17th 1912, after going to sleep hoping not to wake, he awoke to once again find a blizzard blowing and the temperature at -40C (-40F).

    His last words were: "I am just going outside and may be some time."

    Oates' feet were too bad to get his boots on, so he walked out to his death in his socks, his body was never found, in November 1912 a cairn was erected with a cross inscribed: "Hereabouts died a very gallant gentleman, Captain L. E. G. Oates, of the Inniskilling Dragoons. In March 1912, returning from the Pole, he walked willingly to his death in a blizzard, to try and save his comrades, beset by hardships."

    17 March 1880 - 17 March 1912


Robert Falcon Scott

Robert Falcon Scott Commander, R.N. - Expedition leader

expedition leader Discovery 1901-04

    Born into a fairly well to do family in Devon, England, Scott began his naval career in 1881 at the age of 13. His father later sold the brewery he owned, the source of the family income, lost the capital in unwise investments and subsequently died in 1897. Scott's brother died in 1898, at which point his mother and two unmarried sisters became dependent on his naval pay alone, promotion and extra income became a priority.

    A chance encounter with Sir Clements Markham in 1899 led to Scott being offered the command of the Discovery Expedition to Antarctica. He had no polar experience and no real interest beyond the promotion it represented, though the expedition was deemed a great success in both exploration and scientific research, he became a popular hero on his return in 1904.

    The Terra Nova Expedition was again planned to be a far-ranging scientific and exploratory enterprise with one of the stated aims being to reach the South Pole. What became the "Race to the Pole" with Amundsen was not of Scott's making or planning, his party became the second expedition to reach the South Pole in 1912, all five members perished on the return journey. When the news of the South Polar Party reached the UK they were feted as national heroes of the most noble kind, a memorial service led by the King was held in St. Paul's Cathedral within days. Public subscriptions raised £75,509 (the equivalent of over £6 million today) which paid off the expedition debts, and provided money for the families of the dead men, the remaining sum of £12,000 was given to Cambridge University to found the Scott Polar Research Institute, still a world renowned research facility, polar library and museum.

    In later years controversies over Scott's planning, leadership and personality have somewhat overshadowed the extensive wider exploratory and scientific achievements of his two expeditions and of his significant legacy.

    6 June 1868 - 29 March 1912


Scientific Staff


Bernard C Day

Day, Bernard C. - Motor engineer

electrician / motor mechanic Nimrod 1907-09


Edgar Evans

Debenham, Frank - Geologist

    Born in New South Wales, Australia, Debenham started off with a degree in English and philosophy from Sydney University and was a school teacher for a short time before returning to university in 1908 to study Geology in part under Sir Edgeworth David, who had been the Geologist on Shackleton's Nimrod expedition.

    Debenham didn't take part in the South Pole journey due to a knee injury sustained while playing football in the snow, he took part in two western journeys with others exploring and mapping the western mountains of Victoria Land.

    In 1920 using the remainder of  public donations received following the deaths of those in the Polar Party, Debenham along with Raymond Priestly founded the Scott Polar Research Institute, part of Cambridge University to be a repository of information and source of expertise for future expeditions, he was the unpaid director of the Institute from 1920 to 1946. He was one of three scientists who made Cambridge the centre of polar research in the UK.

    26 December 1883 - 23 November 1965


Edgar Evans

Cherry-Garrard, Apsley  - Assistant zoologist

    Born in Bedford, England as Apsley Cherry, the Gerrard was added later when his father inherited a large country estate, which Apsley himself inherited in 1907 on the death of his father.

    The second youngest member of the expedition at 24. Cherry-Garrard was rejected initially by Scott, he then made another application with the promise of a £1,000 payment towards costs, though again was rejected. He decided to donate the money anyway, so Scott with persuasion from Wilson took him on as assistant biologist despite his lack of a scientific background.

    Most famous for his widely acclaimed book about the journey he made with Bowers and Wilson to Cape Crozier to retrieve an emperor penguin egg written about in his book The Worst Journey in the World, published in 1922, and considered to be a classic of travel writing and by many to be the best travel book ever written.

    He was part of the support team for the South Polar Party, reaching the top of the Beardmore Glacier before being sent back with his team. Before Scott left for the pole he gave orders to be met on the 1st of March 1912 at 82 or 82.30 degrees south by a dog team with supplies to help their return to the base. For a variety of reasons it fell to Cherry-Garrard to do this and along with Dimitri he set off on this journey on the 26th of February, reaching a place called "One Ton Depot" on the 3rd of March, at the time Scott was 60 miles south of this point (3 days by dog team), they remained in the area until the 10th of March before returning due to a combination of poor weather and lack of dog food. Scott and the surviving members died 11 miles south of One Ton Depot on the 29th of March. He continued with his scientific work through the winter and was part of the team that found the bodies of Scott, Bowers and Wilson in their collapsed tent on the 12h of November.

    Cherry-Garrard suffered from mental and physical health issues for the rest of his life that arose at least partially from his experiences in Antarctica.

    2 January 1886 - 18 May 1959


Tryggve Gran

Gran, Tryggve - ski expert

    Born in Bergen, Norway to a well to do shipbuilding family. He was recommended by Fridtjof Nansen to Scott as a ski instructor for Scott's upcoming expedition while in Norway to test the motor tractor.

    In Antarctica, Gran was involved in depot laying for the South Pole Party, in the journey to the western mountains and was part of the search party that found the dead bodies of the South Pole Party. He wore Scott's skis after collapsing the tent and building a cairn so that at least Scott's skis would make the full journey. Gran took observations of where the tent was found, in a 1974 interview he said "We have never given anybody the right  latitude and longitude because we were afraid that people would go down and try to find them. As far as I know, I am the only one who's got the figures, because I took the observations and wrote them down".

    Before leaving Antarctica, he climbed Mount Erebus and had a near miss when an eruption ejected large pumice blocks.

    He became interest in flying on his return from Antarctica and was a pioneer of early aviation, being the first person to fly across the North Sea in a heavier than air aircraft, a Bleriot monoplane. He was rejected from volunteering for the Royal Flying Corps at the outbreak of the WW1 as he was a neutral Norwegian, and so joined under an assumed name posing as a Canadian. He received the Norwegian Order of St, Olav and British Distinguished Service Cross and Military Cross during the war. In 1928 he led the search for Roald Amundsen when his plane went missing, himself searching for the missing Italian aviator Umberto Nobile.

    In the Second World War he became a member of a Norwegian fascist party during the German occupation, his status being used for publicity, he was jailed for 18 months for treason in 1948. Sometimes referred to as the last surviving member of the Terra Nova expedition as he died in 1980, though a stoker on the ship, William Burton died in 1988.

    20 January 1888 - 8 January 1980


Cecil H Meares

Meares, Cecil Henry - in charge of dogs, Russian interpreter

    Born in County Kilkenny, Ireland, Meares was an adventurer who followed his own path, prior to the expedition he had been a British army officer, had fought in the Boer and Russo-Japanese wars, he had been a fur trader in the wildest and furthest flung parts of Russia and travelled to a number of little visited places such as Tibet. Scott's by-the-book naval command structure didn't sit too comfortably with him.

    He was tasked by Scott to buy 34 dogs and 20 ponies for the expedition, he knew little about ponies though went to Siberia as instructed to obtain them. Oates who was in charge of the ponies in Antarctica described them as "greatest lot of crocks I have ever seen" Meares took part in depot laying journeys with the dogs, though in Early 1912 he resigned for reasons that are not clearly recorded and returned home on the Terra Nova in March that year, Scott hints at news that he may have been awaiting from the ship when she arrived again in Antarctica and he may have returned to England following the death of his father. He was "unavailable" for for further work after resigning and before leaving, a period of two months when his skills were required though jobs he would have done were carried out by others, notable Cherry-Garrard and Geroff's trip to "One Ton Depot" leaving at the end of February where they awaited Scott and the Polar Party.

    1877 - 1937


Edward Nelson

Nelson, Edward W. - Biologist

    A marine biologist who worked at the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom in Plymouth prior to the expedition. He took part in a sledging journey to One Ton Depot laying supplies.

    He returned to his old employer in Plymouth after the expedition though soon leaving to fight in the WW1. He later became Scientific Superintendent of the Fisheries Board for Scotland. He committed suicide by self administered lethal injection in 1923 at the age of 39.

    1883 - 1923


Herbert Ponting
Ponting, Herbert G. - Camera artist

    Born the son of a successful banker in Wiltshire, England, Ponting spent 4 years from the age of 18 following in his father's footsteps before moving to California, first working in mining before owning a fruit ranch until 1898 when he returned briefly to his family in England now with a wife and one year old daughter. Upon return to California, he turned his long standing hobby of photography into a profession. He built up a sufficient reputation as a photo-journalist that Scott engaged him as expedition photographer on the Terra Nova, the first professional photographer to accompany an Antarctic expedition.

    The great majority of the photographs of the Terra Nova Expedition (including most on this and connected pages) were taken by Ponting. He also took a cine camera and some colour plates at a time when both technologies were in their infancy. He spent 14 months in Antarctica leaving in February 1912 with over 1,700 photographic plates. Part of his task on returning home was to use his pictures to assemble a narrative of the expedition which Scott would use in a fund raising lecture tour when he too returned. Pontings material, both movie and still was intended to help recoup the significant debts of the expedition, and publicize his work widely.

    With Scott's death and subsequent public donations, the expeditions debts were paid off and more, so Ponting's pictures became more of an epitaph than a celebration and earned him little money. He produced two films from his material, The Great White Silence (1924 - silent) and Ninety Degrees South (1933 - with sound).

    The Scott Polar Research Institute bought the photographs for £533,000 in 2009, some were produced as (very expensive) platinum prints and The Great White Silence was restored and re-released in 2011. Ponting's pictures of Antarctica and Scott's expedition are amongst the finest and most iconic from the Heroic Age of Antarctic exploration.

    21 March 1870 - 7 February 1935


Edgar Evans
Priestley, Raymond E. - Geologist

geologist Endurance 1914-17

    Born in Tewkesbury, England the son of a grammar school headmaster, he studied Geology at Bristol University. He joined Shackleton's Antarctic Nimrod Expedition (1907-09) where he worked closely with renowned geologists. He collected mineral and biological samples and was part of supply depot laying teams for Shackleton's attempt on the South Pole. In November 1908 he spent three days in a blizzard sleeping outside the tents in his sleeping bag due to a lack of space inside. As the blizzard progressed, he gradually slipped down the glacier nearly falling off the end to his death.

    Priestley was recruited by Scott for the Terra Nova expedition when the ship called at Sydney on the way south. He was part of what was intended to be an Eastern Party of 6 men led by Campbell to carry out scientific work, failing to find a landing site, they returned westward again when he met Roald Amundsen on the Fram in the Bay of Whales. On return Campbell's party became the Northern Party, built a hut and wintered at Cape Adare in 1911. The following summer they were transferred about 250 miles by the Terra Nova to Evans Coves with enough sledging rations for 6 weeks and the intention of staying 2 weeks before being picked up again. Sea ice conditions meant that the ship could not reach them and they had to over-winter again. An ice cave was excavated on Inexpressible Island and a miserable winter ensued, rations being extended with the occasional seal or penguin that could be killed. They left at the end of winter on the 30th of September 1912, heading for Cape Evans, crossing 200 miles of sea ice to arrive on the 7th of November when they were informed of the deaths of Scott and the South Polar party.

    Priestly served in the WW1 with distinction being awarded the Military Cross, he remained in the army until 1920 when he was awarded a BA at Cambridge for his work and writings on glaciers. In this same year he co-founded the Scott Polar Research Institute in Cambridge with fellow Terra Nova expedition member Frank Debenham. He had a long administrative university career holding many academic and government posts in Australia and England. He was Vice-Chancellor of the University of Melbourne, later the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Birmingham (1938-52) being knighted in 1949. Despite retiring in 1952, he served variously as Chairman of the Royal Commission on the Civil Service, deputy Director of the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (later called the British Antarctic Survey), and president of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (1956). He returned to Antarctica in 1956 and 1959.

    20 July 1886 - 24 June 1974


George Simpson
Simpson, George Clarke - Meteorologist

    Born in Derby, England, Simpson was the first person to lecture in meteorology at a British university when he was appointed in 1905 in Manchester, in 1906 he joined the Indian Meteorological Service before being appointed as one of two meteorologists to the Terra Nova expedition.

    He was given the nickname "Sunny Jim" because of his resemblance to a character on cereal packets. Clarke was one of the Northern Party that over wintered at Cape Adare in 1911 followed by a very uncomfortable winter in an ice cave in 1912 when heavy pack ice prevented them from being picked up by the Terra Nova. At Cape Adare they constructed what they called a "Carusophone" an alarm clock timed by a burning candle which triggered a gramophone which played a record presumably by the Italian opera singer Enrico Caruso, this enabled them to take meteorological reading through the night without anyone needing to stay awake.

    On return from the Antarctic he went back to India where he was drafted into military service in the WW1, in 1920 he became Director of the Meteorological Office in London, where he was its longest serving Director until he retired in 1938. He was knighted in 1935. In the Second World War, he served in charge of the Kew Observatory. He was awarded honorary doctoral degrees by the universities of universities of Manchester, Sydney and Aberdeen.

    2 September 1878 - 1 January 1965


Taylor, Thomas Griffith - Geologist

    Born in Walthamstow, England, the family emigrated to Australia when Thomas was 13, he attended the University of Sydney, initially in the arts but graduating in mining and metallurgy in 1905. He was awarded a scholarship to Cambridge University in 1907 when he became friends with Raymond Priestley, Charles Wright and Frank Debenham all of whom be recruited to Scott's Terra Nova expedition.

    Taylor was the leader of the geological team who made the first maps and geological studies of large areas of Antarctica, leading two expeditions to never explored areas to do so. During the second of these, Taylor's party were due to be picked up by the Terra Nova on Jan 15th 1912, but the ship could not reach them, on the 5th of Feb, they set off across the ice where they were seen and picked up on the 18th of Feb, returning home in March unaware of the fate of Scott and his party.

    Taylor's work in Antarctica earned him a doctorate from the University of Sydney and he was made a fellow of the Royal Geographical Society of London. He was made made Associate Professor of Geography at Sydney in 1921 and was the founding head of the Geography Department. He became a controversial character partly due to his views on race and opposition of the Government's White Australia policy, and partly due to what were seen at the time as pessimistic views on Australia's arid interior leading for a time to a ban on some of his works, he also wrote widely on human races. While he faced strong opposition from some powerful people who opposed his views, he is now highly regarded for his remarkably accurate predictions.

    1 December 1880 - 5 November 1963


Wilson, Edward Adrian - chief of scientific staff and biologist

Assistant surgeon Discovery 1901-04

    Born in Cheltenham, England, the son of a physician, educated at Cheltenham College and Caius College Cambridge where he read Zoology before qualifying in medicine at St. George's Hospital London. Shortly after he qualified as a doctor, Wilson became ill with tuberculosis, during the long convalescence he practiced and developed his skills as an artist.

    In 1901, Wilson applied to be doctor on Scott's Discovery Expedition to Antarctica, he was not fully recovered from his illness when first appointed, but Scott saw his potential and took him on as vertebrate zoologist and artist as well as doctor. He made an attempt on the South Pole with Scott and Shackleton, they reached the furthest south point at that time, 480 miles from the pole, Shackleton was suffering from scurvy and unable to pull the sledge, after 93 days and 960 miles, they managed to struggle back to safety. Shackleton invited him to join his Nimrod expedition in 1907, but he declined, partly from loyalty to Scott.

    On the Terra Nova Expedition he accompanied Cherry-Garrard and Wilson in their trip to Cape Crozier to retrieve an emperor penguin egg in the winter of 1911, famously written about in the book "The Worst Journey in the World". The three men endured the coldest temperatures recorded on the expedition, as low as -57C (-70F) in the dark of the Antarctic night. Wilson was one of the 5 man South Pole Party who perished on the return journey, Wilson died in the tent at the last camp with Scott and Bowers, he was 39 years old.

    He was known as "Uncle Bill" and popular for his easy manner, he gained great respect from the men he worked with,  A lasting and acclaimed legacy is the collection of water colour pictures that he made during his two Antarctic expeditions. There is a statue of him in Cheltenham sculptured by Scott's widow Kathleen.

    "Words must always fail me when I talk of Bill Wilson. I believe he really is the finest character I ever met." - Scott

    23 July 1872 - 29 March 1912


Charles Seymour Wright, 1912
Wright, Charles Seymour - Physicist

    Born in Toronto, Canada and educated in Canada until he won a scholarship for postgraduate studies in Cambridge, England where he met Douglas Mawson just returned from Shackleton's Nimrod Expedition. He applied to Scott for the Terra Nova was was initially rejected so walked to London to see Scott in person at which point he was accepted. Sometimes known as "Silas" from his middle name.

    In Antarctica, Wright carried out numerous experiments and observations on the physics of ice and snow, gravity, the aurora and magnetism, he also assisted in meteorology. He was part of a four man team who mapped the western mountains of Victoria Land and made geological observations. On the 1st of November 1911 he set off with the Southern Party to the South Pole, he hoped to be one of those chosen to go with Scott to the pole but was part of the first support party sent back with around 300 miles to go. Nearly a year later he was part of the search party that found the tent with the bodies of Scott, Bowers and Wilson who had died on the return journey.

    On his return to England, he married the sister of fellow Terra Nova expedition member Raymond Priestley. He served with distinction in the WW1 being awarded the Military Cross and the Order of the British Empire (OBE). In 1919 he joined the Admiralty Research Department, rising to become Director of Scientific research from 1934-36. In the Second World War he was involved in the development of radar and the detection of mines and torpedoes, he was knighted for this work in 1946. He was made the first chief of the Royal Naval Scientific Service on its formation in 1946, in 1951 he became Director of the Marine Physical Laboratory of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the USA, returning to Canada again on the Defence Research Board of Canada's Pacific Naval Laboratory in 1955.

    He returned to Antarctica in 1960-61 during the 50th anniversary of Scott's expedition working and Byrd Station and elsewhere. While in Antarctica he refused to talk about Scott's expedition, even when refreshed with a few drinks. At the end of the season, as a large crowd gathered to say goodbye, he was about to get on the plane and someone asked how he liked Antarctica after so many years. "Personally, I hate the f--king place!" He then turned and disappeared into the plane, he returned once more however in 1965. He retired in 1969 at the age of 82.

    7 April 1887 - 1 November 1975


Crew


Abbot, George P. - petty officer, R.N.

    A member of the Northern Party at Cape Adare, wintered on Inexpressible Island. Abbot served with the Royal Navy in the WW1, he died in 1923.


Archer, Walter William - Chief steward, late R.N.

    Served as a shipboard cook for two years and then was assigned to the shore party for the final year. He left the navy after the war and ran a catering business in London, he died on the 28th of January 1944.


Browning, Frank Vernon - petty officer, 2nd class, R.N.

    Born in Devon, England, joined the Royal Navy as a Boy 2nd Class in June 1900 at 18 and was made Petty Officer 2nd Class in November 1905, he was recruited to the Terra Nova Expedition from the Talbot, one of Lieutenant E. R. G. R. Evans (2nd in command on the expedition) old ships. Part of the Northern Party under Campbell, they spent one winter in the hut at at Cape Evans and another unplanned in an ice cave when the party could not be picked up due to heavy sea ice. Browning and Abbott constructed an entrance hatch to the cave from ski-sticks and ice blocks after the original snow construction kept collapsing bring with it the threat of asphyxiation. He also came up with a "blubber lamp" along with Dickason to light the otherwise pitch black living quarters which was fuelled by fat from the few penguins and seals they managed to capture through the winter.

    June 1882 -


Thomas Clissold

Clissold, Thomas Charles - cook, late R.N.

    An artificer (a highly skilled and experienced field mechanic) in the Royal Navy, Clissold joined the expedition as a cook, but also worked ashore as a dog handler and with sledges laying supply depots. While posing for a photograph being taken by Ponting in the summer of 1911-12, he fell off an iceberg sustaining a severe concussion leading to him being replaced as shore party cook the following year. He served in the Royal Flying Corps in WW1, emigrating to New Zealand when demobilized. He served in the Transport Department in Napier, NZ until his retirement in 1953.

    1886 - 1963


Tom Crean, Scott Expedition 1911

Crean, Tom , petty officer, R.N.

Able seaman Discovery 1901-04
second officer Endurance 1914-17

    Born in Annascaul, County Kerry, Ireland, one of ten children. Crean  joined the Royal Navy at 15, by 22 in 1899, he had worked his way up to the rank of Petty Officer. He was what is often described as "hardbitten" tough, and determined, he had been disrated in the Navy for drunken and inappropriate behaviour and had a less than satisfactory character reference from the Navy, this happened just before he joined the Discovery expedition with Scott, the first of three journeys he would make to Antarctica.. He frequently came across as heavy handed and tactless - forthright - to be more charitable.

    Crean joined Scott's Discovery expedition when he was in Christchurch, New Zealand in December 1901 serving aboard HMS Ringarooma, the Discovery was also in port and in need of an extra crewmember, he left his own ship to join as a volunteer able seaman. He gained a reputation for being one of the most effective man-haulers in the party and was well liked and respected by the other men. Crean returned to naval duty after the expedition and was promoted to Petty Officer 1st class following Scott's recommendation.

    Scott requested that Crean should join him in serving on his ship and for the next few years, the two served together on a number of vessels. Crean was one of the men Scott chose first for the Terra Nova expedition, he was appointed as an expert sledger and pony handler, he was also one of the few men on the expedition with previous polar experience. Crean was very actively involved in sledging journeys as might be expected, on one occasion he was caught out camping on sea ice that broke out in the night with Cherry-Garrard and Bowers, they were separated from their sledges, Crean jumped from flow to floe and was able to summon help.

    He was a part of the last group to be turned back 160 miles from the pole by Scott after not being selected for the final Pole Party, Scott described him as weeping with disappointment at having to turn back so close to the goal. He set off back with Lashly and Edward Evans, a 730 mile journey. They lost their way at one point and with food supplies low and a long detour around an icefall the safest route, instead decided to sledge uncontrolled down the steep icefall, reaching what Evans estimated at 60mph at times, they stopped by overturning the sledge.

    Evans developed snow blindness after removing his snow goggles while trying to find the route and began to show signs of scurvy, he was greatly weakened, was passing blood and was in constant pain, Crean and Lashly began pulling him on the sledge. On the 18th of February, there was still 35 miles to go and 4-5 days manhauling with just 1-2 days of rations left and a blizzard had started. They decided that Lashly would stay with Evans while Crean would fetch help, with a little food and no tent or other equipment Crean walked for 18 hours when he met with Atkinson, Gerov and a dog team at Hut Point. He arrived just before a blizzard struck which would almost have certainly have killed him had he been caught it, as it was he was on the verge of collapse on arrival. Evans who was close to death and Lashly were successfully rescued, Crean played down his part but wrote in a letter "So it fell to my lot to do the 30 miles for help, and only a couple of biscuits and a stick of chocolate to do it. Well, sir, I was very weak when I reached the hut".

    The winter of 1912 was passed in a very sombre atmosphere as the Polar Party had not returned and their deaths assumed, Crean was a part of the group who found their final camp in November of that year.

    On return to England Crean was awarded promotion and the Polar and Albert medals for his part in the expedition and for saving Evans' life. In 1914, he was appointed as second officer on Shackleton's Endurance Expedition. He was one of six men who crossed the ocean from Elephant Island to South Georgia in the James Caird and one of three who walked across South Georgia to seek a rescue for the men left behind from Stromness whaling station. Shackleton wanted him to accompany him on the Quest expedition in 1922, but a growing family and plans to start a business after leaving the navy caused him to turn him down.

    He returned to Annascaul county Kerry and opened a pub he called The South Pole Inn which he ran until his death in 1938 at the age of 61. He never spoke of his Antarctic exploits to his family, in the words of his daughter "He put his medals and his sword in a box ... and that was that. He was a very humble man", the pub is still open for business.

    25 February 1877 - 27 July 1938


Dickason, Harry - Able seaman, R.N.

    A member of the Northern Party at Cape Adare, wintered on Inexpressible Island. Abbot served with the Royal Navy in the WW1, he was pensioned by the Royal Navy in 1924 and died in 1943.


Edgar Evans

Evans, Edgar - Petty officer, 2nd class, R.N.

    petty officer Terra Nova 1910-13

    Born 1876 in Middleton, Wales, enlisted in the Royal Navy at 13 in 1891 and served on the same ship as Scott in 1899, Evans was a part of Scott's Discovery Expedition from 1901-1904.

    Evans almost didn't make the Terra Nova expedition, falling into the sea while drunk on boarding the ship in New Zealand, Scott overlooked this and valued him highly. He was responsible for the sledges, tents and all the equipment that was taken by sledging parties, that it was all present and in good working order, a task at which he excelled. He was one of the five man South Pole Party with Scott. Just before reaching the pole he cut his hand in an accident, the wound refused to heal properly and he continued to deteriorate both physically and mentally during the return journey suffering frostbite to fingers, nose and cheeks. He had a fall in a crevasse while descending the Beardmore Glacier causing a concussion from a head injury which rapidly worsened his condition.

    On the 16th of February 1912 he collapsed and had to be temporarily left behind while the others in the party reached the next supply depot, on returning to get him Scott described him as "'He was on his knees, clothing disarranged, hands uncovered and frostbitten and with a "wild look in his eyes". ". He was taken to the tent on a sledge and put inside, he died during the night, there is no record of what happened to his body. He was 35 years old.

    7 March 1876 - 17 February 1912


Robert Forde

Forde, Robert - petty officer, R.N.

    Born near to the city of Cork, Ireland and related to the car maker Henry Ford. He joined the Royal Navy at 16 in 1910 he volunteered for and was accepted on the Terra Nova expedition.

    He spent two years of the expedition ashore at Cape Evans and took part in a western journey exploring and mapping the western mountains of Victoria Land.

    He wore a glove on his hand to protect it following the effects of frostbite on his return for the rest of his life.

    29 August 1875 - 13 March 1959


Robert Forde

Girev (Geroff), Dmitrii Semenovich - Dog driver

    Dmitrii Girev was one of two Russians on Scott's expedition, the other being the groom Anton Omelchenko, they came to the attention of Meares who was sent to Siberia to buy both ponies and dogs for the expedition and were recommended as excellent handlers of the animals upon which they were both recruited.

    Girev had his name written by Scott in his diary as Geroff and so is often seen referred to by this, he is also sometimes mistakenly spelt  as Girov likewise Dmitrii sometimes becomes Dimiti or even Dmitriy. He was born in the village of Aleksandrovsk on Sakhalin Island off the far eastern coast of Russia, just north of Japan. He was the son of a convict who had been deported to Sakhalin, as such men were barred from marrying church, he was considered illegitimate and took his mother's name. In 1897 at the end of their exile, the family moved to Nikolaevsk-on-Amur on the mainland of Russia next to Sakhalin where he went to school and then trained as an electrician. Dog teams were indispensable in the area where he lived and he became famous as one of the best dog handlers there, he learned how to drive dogs from the native people of Amur. He travelled to Antarctica via Vladivostok, Shanghai, and Sydney, joining the Terra Nova in Christchurch.

    He became a popular and effective member of the expedition and took part in laying supply depots with the dogs, he was also one of the team who found the dead members of the South Pole Party at their final camp.

    After the expedition he returned to Siberia where he found employment in gold mining and dredging, In 1930 he was arrested in a communist party purge and imprisoned in Vladivostok for 18 months, he died of a heart attack on his way home on release at the age of 43.

    1889 - 1932


Tom Crean, Scott Expedition 1911

Hooper, Frederick J. - Steward, late R.N.

    Hooper served first on the ship and then later joined the shore party. He participated in sledging journeys including the search for the missing pole party and the second ascent of Mount Erebus. He died in Southport in 1955.

    1891 - 1955


Keohane, Patrick - petty officer, R.N.

    Born in County Cork, Ireland, he was a seaman petty officer in the Royal Navy at the time of the expedition being selected by Teddy Evans for the expedition. He was part of the group at Cape Evans, participating in many sledging trips, he was part of the support party that ascended the Beardmore Glacier and of the party that found the dead polar party. He returned to Ireland after the expedition and joined the coast guard, rejoining the navy in WW2.

    1879 - 1950


Edgar Evans

Lashly, William - chief stoker, R.N.

    Born in Hampshire, England, the son of a farm worker, he left school at 11 and joined the Royal Navy at 21. Lashly played an active sledging role in Scott's Discovery expedition of 1901-1904, acknowledged by Chief Engineer Reginald Skelton as "the best man far and away in the ship", he  was sought out by Scott for the Terra Nova expedition.

    Lashly was in charge of one of the motor sledges, he set off in a small party with 2 of them to haul supplies for the pole attempt, within 5 days, they had both broken down and the men had to resort to manhauling. He was a part of the last group of three turned back 160 miles from the pole by Scott after not being selected for the final Pole Party. He set off back to the hut with Crean and Edward Evans, a 730 mile journey. They lost their way at one point and with food supplies low and a long detour around an icefall the safest route, instead decided to sledge uncontrolled down the steep icefall, reaching what Evans estimated at 60mph at times, they stopped by overturning the sledge.

    Evans developed snow blindness after removing his snow goggles while trying to find the route and began to show signs of scurvy, he was greatly weakened, was passing blood and was in constant pain, Lashly and Crean began pulling him on the sledge. On the 18th of February, there was still 35 miles to go and 4-5 days manhauling with just 1-2 days of rations left and a blizzard had started. They decided that Lashly would stay with Evans while Crean would fetch help. Evans who was close to death and Lashly were successfully rescued, Lashly and Crean were awarded the Albert Medal for his role.

    On his return from the Antarctic, Lashly retired from the nay on a pension, though joined the reserves and served again with the navy in WW1, retiring from the nay again afterwards to join the Customs service from which he retired in 1932. He called his house "Minna Bluff" after a rocky outcrop jutting out from Mount Discovery, a landmark that  on the way to the South Pole.

    25 December 1867 - 12 June 1940 more on William Lashly


Edgar Evans

Omelchenko, Anton - Groom

    Born in Bat'ki, near Poltava in the Ukraine into a peasant farming family, he became groom to a local estate becoming a jockey. It was as a jockey in Vladivostok in 1909 that he was recruited by Meares to help select the Manchurian ponies he had been sent by Scott to buy. Along with fellow Russian Girev he accompanied the ponies and dogs via New Zealand to Antarctica. Omelchenko was assistant to Oates who was in charge of the ponies, he became a popular and hard working member of the expedition working with the ponies on several sledging journeys.

    In WW1 he fought with the army in Russia and later with the Red Army. He returned to Bat'ki where he helped to establish a collective farm, he was killed by lightning in 1932 at the age of 49.

    1883 - 1932


Williamson, Thomas Soulsbury - petty officer, R.N.

able seaman Discovery 1901-04

    One of the search party that found the bodies of Bowers, Scott and Wilson in their tent having died on the return journey from the South Pole.

    Born 1877 Sunderland - died January 1940.

Ship's Party


Bailey, Arthur S. - Petty officer, 2nd class, R.N.

Edgar Evans

Albert Balson - Leading seaman, R.N.

    Albert Balson was born in his grandfather's home during the first quarter of 1885 in Allington near Bridport, Dorset, his later home was in Bothenhampton, Bridport, Dorset. In the 1901 census he is seen to be a RN 2nd. class boy at HMS Boscowen, Portland near Weymouth, Dorset. Albert Balson's father was a baker born during 1838 in Allington near Bridport, Dorset. His Grandfather was a master baker baptized 12-10-1810 in Allington near Bridport, Dorset. His great grandfather was a blacksmith/wheelwright baptized 18-04-1784 in Allington near Bridport, Dorset.

       "Leading seaman Albert Balson was the half brother of my grandfather, Charles Stephen Balson"  - Information thanks to Charles Balson - 2005:


Brissenden, Robert - Leading stoker, R.N.

    Drowned at Elmslie Bay, French Pass (South Island, New Zealand) while surveying Admiralty Bay in 1912, the grave is on the hill above the wharf at Elmsie Bay erected by members of the expedition.

Bruce, Wilfred Montague - Commander, R.N.R.

    Born in Scotland, Bruce became an officer in the merchant navy and the Royal Naval Reserve, he was Scotts brother in law. He helped in the collection and transportation of the ponies and dogs for the expedition from Vladivostok and then served as second officer on the Terra Nova. He served as a captain RNR in WW!, retiring from this shortly after the war to become a pig farmer.

    1874 - 1953


Burton, William (Bill) - Leading stoker, R.N.

    Died in Lyttleton, New Zealand, 1988, seven weeks short of his 100th birthday, the last surviving man from the Terra Nova expedition.

Alfred Cheetham

Cheetham, Alfred Buchanan - Boatswain (Bosun), R.N.R.

  Morning - relief ship for the Discovery 1902
  Third officer and boatswain Nimrod 1907-09
  Third officer  Endurance 1914-17 - 47 at the start of the expedition

    Born in Liverpool, his family moved to Hull about ten years later, at the time Hull was a great fishing port and Cheetham ran away to sea as a teenager working on North Sea fishing boats. He became a merchant navy boatswain working out of Hull and a Royal Naval Reservist.

    Cheetham first went to Antarctica on the Morning, the relief ship for Scott's Discovery expedition in the austral summers of 1902-3 and 1903-04. He met Shackleton who was invalided home on the second voyage and was invited on his Nimrod expedition as boatswain and third officer. He held the same roles on the Terra Nova and again with Shackleton on the Endurance.

    A popular and cheerful member of crews on which he served, Frank Worsley (captain of the Endurance) called him "a pirate to his fingertips".

    On return from the Endurance expedition, he enlisted in the Mercantile Marine and while serving as an Officer his ship was torpedoed in the North Sea by a German U-Boat on the 22nd of August 1918, Alf went down with the ship, he was 51.

    6 May 1867 - 22 August 1918


Adelie penguin Adelie penguin

Davies, Francis E.C. - Leading shipwright, R.N.

    Francis built the sheds at Cape Evans, and later on when returning on the Terra Nova and hearing of the death of Scott and the polar party, made the memorial cross that still stands on Observation Hill near to what is now McMurdo base.

    He returned to Plymouth, England to live after the expedition.


James Dennistoun
Dennistoun, James R. - In charge of mules in the ship.

Drake, Francis R.H. - Asst. Paymaster, R.N. (retired), secretary and meteorologist in the ship.

Heald, William L. - R.N. Late P.O.

Horton, William A. - Engine room artificer, R.N. 2nd Engineer

Knowles, William - Able seaman

  Morning - relief ship for the Discovery 1902

    Born in Liverpool, England, he emigrated to Lyttleton, New Zealand where he joined the Royal Naval Reserve. He joined the relief ship Morning as part of Scott's Discovery and became an able seaman on the Terra Nova. After the expedition, on the 7th of February 1915, Knowles had the dubious distinction of being the first New Zealander killed as a result of enemy action in WW1 at the age of 38, he had married in 1904 and left a wife and two children. more on Able Seaman William Knowles.

    1877 - 1915


Lammas, Charles Frederick - Fireman

    1875 - 1951


Leese, Joseph - Able seaman, R.N.

    Died in 1948 at the age of 64


Edgar Evans

Lillie, Dennis G. - Biologist in the ship


Mather, John Hugh - Petty officer, R.N.V.R.

    Born in Stroud Green, London, he was n the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve helping to load the Terra Nova when he applied to join the ship, serving for three years as petty officer. He helped in particular with the clerical work and became skilled in taxonomy. Later as a commissioned officer, he served in WW1 and retired with the rank of commander. He began the Antarctic Club in 1929, an annual dining club for the former members of British expeditions, he remained the honorary secretary until he died.

    1887 - 1957


Mortimer McCarthyMcCarthy, Mortimer - Able seaman

    Born in Kinsale, County Cork, Ireland, older brother to Tim McCarthy, one of only two pairs of brothers to serve with Scott and Shackleton. Mortimer lied about his age and went to sea at 12, he served in the Royal Navy during the Boer War. He made three round-trips to the Antarctic on the Terra Nova. He settled in Lyttleton, New Zealand working as a seaman for over 70 years and was still working on ships in his 80s. He made a nostalgic trip to Antarctica 1963 at the age of 81, he died in a fire at his home aged 85.

    15 April 1878 - 1967


McDonald, Angus - Fireman

    Lived in Invercargill, New Zealand.


McDonald, William - Able seaman


McGillon, Thomas - Fireman

McKenzie, Edward A. - Leading stoker, R.N.

    Born in Norfolk, England, joined the Royal Navy in 1903 and reached the rank of leading stoker by the time he volunteered for the expedition. On his return and on leaving the navy, he joined the London Metropolitan Police. He served in the army and navy in WW1, going back to the police afterwards until he was invalided out in 1942.

    1888 - 1973


McLeod, Thomas F. - Able seaman

  Terra Nova 1910 - 13
  Able seaman Endurance 1914-17
  Able Seaman Quest 1921 - 1922

    Born in Glasgow, Scotland and brought up in Stornoway, the Outer Hebrides, McLeod first went to sea aged 14. He was one of very few able seamen who received two polar medals, one from the Terra Nova expedition and the other from the Endurance.

    3 April 1873 - 16 of December 1960


Neale, William Henry - Steward

    Born 31 October 1888 in Portsmouth, Hampshire. Awarded the Silver Polar medal personally by King George V.

    Information and picture courtesy Garry Neale, great grandson of W.H.Neale.

Oliphant, Robert - Able seaman

Parsons, Frederick - Petty officer, R.N.

    Returned to his native Plymouth after the expedition and ran a shoe repair business, he called his bungalow "Terra Nova", he died at the age of 91.


Paton, James - Able seaman

  Morning - relief ship for the Discovery 1902
  Able seaman Discovery 1901-04
  Able seaman Nimrod 1907-09
  Boatswain, Aurora on Shackleton's 1914-17 trans-Antarctic Expedition - Ross Sea Party

    Born in Scotland and known as "Scotty", Paton sailed on both of the voyages of the Morning the relief ship to Scott's Discovery expedition. On the first voyage while the Morning was temporarily prevented from progressing by ice in between Cape Bird and Beaufort Island, Paton jumped off the ship and jumping from flow to floe for over a mile became the first man to land on Beaufort Island. He sailed on the Nimrod twice during her southern journeys and again on the Terra Nova, twice between New Zealand and Cape Evans.

    On the Aurora in 1915 as part of the Ross Sea Party of Shackleton's attempt to cross Antarctica via the South Pole, he drifted for 9 months in pack ice before limping back to New Zealand, his last journey to Antarctica was in January 1917 to rescue the stranded Ross Sea Party. He stayed with the Aurora on her return to New Zealand when she was sold and became a coal carrier. She left New South Wales in June 1917 heading for South America never to be seen again, Paton was lost with the ship. It is thought that she may have hit a mine laid by the German raider Wolf in the Tasmanian Sea.

    1869 - 1917


Pennell, Harry Lewin Lee - Navigator, Lieutenant, R.N.

    Pennell spent his time on the Terra Nova, going back with her and spending austral winters in Lyttleton, New Zealand, he was a keen amateur naturalist and helped biologists Wilson and Lillie in their studies of birds and whales. He was assigned to the HMS Queen Mary (a battlecruiser) as a navigator in 1914 and died in the battle of Jutland when she was sunk with the loss of 1,266 lives. more on Pennell and the battle of Jutland

    1882 - 1916


Rennick, Henry E. de P. - Lieutenant, R.N.

Skelton, James - Able seaman

    Born in Lincolnshire, England, he was a senior engineer in the Royal Navy when he joined the Terra Nova expedition. He supervised the fitting out of the ship. He took part in several sledge journey's though due to naval protocols he was left behind by the South Pole Party rather than accompanying the motor sledges, as a result they both broke down within 5 days, whereas Skelton as the expert could perhaps have kept them going for longer. He became an accomplished photographer during his time in Antarctica.

    In WW1, he was in charge of the dockyard facilities at Archangel, Russia. He retired from the navy with the rank of Engineer Vice-Admiral in 1932 and became a director of Thorneycroft and Co. shipbuilders.

    1872 - 1956


Stone, Bernard J. - Leading stoker, R.N.

Williams, Charles - Able seaman

    Born in Lyttleton, New Zealand the son of a master mariner, he went to sea in 1895 and joined the navy in early 1900's. He received the Antarctic Medal and Royal Geographical Society Medal following his action in a storm that stopped the Terra Nova foundering in a storm, cutting a hole in a bulhead between the boilers in blistering heat to allow the blocked pump to be cleared.

    In 1915 he received a letter from Teddy Evans and went to England to join the Royal Navy, he served under Evans on HMS Broke during a famous action where she encountered 6 German battleships along with HMS Swift. Williams became engaged in deck fighting with cutlasses and bayonets when the Germans boarded the Broke for which he received the Distinguished Service Order and a promotion. more on Charles Williams

    1881 - 1919


Williams, William - Chief engine room artificer, R.N. Engineer